Music Reviews

  1. #
  2. A
  3. B
  4. C
  5. D
  6. E
  7. F
  8. G
  9. H
  10. I
  11. J
  12. K
  13. L
  14. M
  15. N
  16. O
  17. P
  18. Q
  19. R
  20. S
  21. T
  22. U
  23. V
  24. W
  25. X
  26. Y
  27. Z


posted: February 26, 2014

English Oceans

ATO LP, CD

In his excellent new book I’ll Take You There: Mavis Staples, the Staple Singers, and the March Up Freedom’s Highway, veteran critic Greg Kot discusses the harmonic blend of styles that distinguished the late 1960s/early 1970s era Muscle Shoals sound from every other locale in America. Read More


posted: January 21, 2013

FIDLAR FIDLAR

Mom + Pop LP, CD
FIDLAR

Never mind that the two main parties in the U.S. government won’t compromise for the common good, that unchecked global warming increasingly devastates food supplies and environmental balances, that debt-induced recession looms over the international marketplace, and that tensions in the Middle East continue to spiral beyond control. Read More


posted: July 6, 2011

Field Songs – William Elliott Whitmore

While he’s only in his early 30s, singer-songwriter William Elliott Whitmore carries the burdens of a man twice his age. His first three albums—Hymns for the Hopeless, Ashes to Dust and Song of the Blackbird—make up a gruesome trilogy, dense with banjo-driven funeral songs inspired by the deaths of both of his parents. Read More


posted: April 21, 2011

Fleet Foxes

“So now I’m older,” confesses Fleet Foxes leader Robin Pecknold on “Montezuma,” opening the band’s anticipated sophomore record with a sentiment that largely informs the intelligently crafted, complexly arranged, and gorgeously executed album. Indeed, feelings and realities of being older seemingly consume the sweet-timbered singer-songwriter, who uses Helplessness Blues as a platform for soul-searching, questioning personal identity, reflecting on life purposes, and contemplating existence. Read More


posted: June 26, 2017

Fleet Foxes Crack-Up

Nonesuch, 2LP or CD
Fleet Foxes

“I am all that I need.” These are the words that greet the listener at the start of Fleet Foxes’ Crack-Up, the group’s first album in six years. It’s a phrase that immediately seems to shut out the eavesdropper, and you must strain to hear it. Singer/band architect Robin Pecknold appears buried in the shadows of some deep-toned, echo-filled acoustic guitar notes, sounding as if he doesn’t really want to be found. Read More


posted: February 14, 2009

Fleet Foxes – Fleet Foxes

If you’re one of those music fans who believe there’s nothing new under the sun and that truly original music merely consists of disparate elements thrown together, you might be more than a little challenged by the eponymous debut of the Fleet Foxes.   While this Seattle quintet calls their music “baroque harmonic pop jams,” I think it’s downright otherworldly, mixing a Weavers-style folk sensibility with Americana, country, ’60s psychedelia and a touch of Gregorian chant. Read More


posted: February 14, 2009

Flobots – Fight With Tools

I have an audiophile pal in his late 50s who still can’t believe that I listen to hip-hop, and he clings to that antiquated and stubborn mind frame that there’s no musical value in rap. Fear of a Black Planet didn’t convince him, nor did Stankonia. Something tells me, however, that Fight With Tools might. Read More


posted: May 26, 2011

Fucked up

Damian Abraham’s intense, throaty voice is one of the most riveting instruments in music. His robust pipes are a human bullhorn, his volatile chords seemingly bulging on steroids—each blustery syllable emanating from the stout frontman’s mouth coming across like the barked orders of an iron-lunged drill sergeant. Read More


  1. #
  2. A
  3. B
  4. C
  5. D
  6. E
  7. F
  8. G
  9. H
  10. I
  11. J
  12. K
  13. L
  14. M
  15. N
  16. O
  17. P
  18. Q
  19. R
  20. S
  21. T
  22. U
  23. V
  24. W
  25. X
  26. Y
  27. Z

Recent Music Reviews